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Will Your Standby Generator Stand Up?
Jan 28th, 2016 by Grow With Tyson

By Jess Campbell, Dennis Brothers, Gene Simpson, and Jim Donald
National Poultry Technology Center, Auburn University

Most growers are confident in their generator’s ability to run for 30 minutes to an hour without problems because they are typically cycled once a week. But what if they needed to run for a week or more? The tornado devastation that occurred in April of this year in Alabama caused power outages for a large number of poultry farms lasting from 2 to 10 days or more. For growers who had chickens, this meant running on generator power until utility power was restored. Many growers were able to keep their generators working flawlessly to maintain power throughout the outage; but others were not so fortunate. Read more in this downloadable PDF.

PTC Poultry House Lighting Tips – Energy Efficient Bulb Dimming
Jun 5th, 2012 by Grow With Tyson


This video explains how to properly set your poultry house dimmers for Cold Cathode and Compact Fluorescent bulbs to insure bulb longevity and energy savings.

Hot Circuit Breaker? A Fan is NOT the Solution
Aug 25th, 2011 by Grow With Tyson

This month’s Poultry Housing Tip from the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Cooperative Extension discusses how using a circulation fan to cool a hot breaker does not solve the problem:

With market age birds the last thing a producer wants is for the main electrical panel circuit breaker to trip.  Though it often seems like it may happen without any warning, the truth is that in most cases there is a very clear indicator that an electrical breaker will trip sometime in the near future, namely because the breaker is hot.  Basically, an electrical circuit breaker operates on temperature. As the flow of electrical current through a breaker increases, so does the temperature of the circuit breaker. Each circuit breaker is rated for a specific current flow. If the current exceeds a circuit breaker’s rating, it will warm up to a point where it will “break” the circuit, cutting power to the device/devices to prevent an electrical fire.  In addition to excessive current flow, circuit breaker overheating can be the result of poor quality electrical connections.  Poor electrical connections increase the resistance to the flow of electrical current, resulting in the generation of heat.  Potential problem areas include where the wires connect to the circuit breaker, where the circuit breaker connects to the main panel or possible electrical connections within the circuit breaker itself.  Generally, the temperature of a circuit breaker should not exceed 140oF.  If it does, this means the circuit breaker is in danger of tripping.  A good “rule of thumb” is that if you can’t hold your finger on the plastic part of the circuit breaker without getting burned, it is too hot . . . ”

Click HERE (PDF download) to read more.


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